The Garden City Telegram explains

ALEC push: Kansans need to understand group’s influence on policy.

Many Republican legislators in the Kansas Statehouse follow a specific agenda.

It’s not Kansas-based, but does come from a political organization supported in part by Kansas’ own Koch brothers: the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), on a mission to shrink government and drive corporate profits.

A “bill mill” for ultraconservative policy making, ALEC views statehouses nationwide as places to gain more traction, and has made significant inroads in Kansas.

ALEC has enlisted numerous GOP state lawmakers to push dozens of its “free-market, limited government” initiatives in recent years in Kansas, to include 2012 legislation for massive income-tax cuts for businesses and other wealthy Kansans that wrecked the state budget.

Examples of ALEC pursuits:

• Privatizing education, while undermining support for public schools and educators

• Blocking Medicaid expansion

• Using bogus claims of voter fraud to enact Voter ID and related strategies that suppress the vote

• Erasing renewable portfolio standards that encourage wind energy and other renewables

Key ALEC allies in Kansas include Senate President Susan Wagle and House Speaker Ray Merrick, both ALEC board members.

They’re set to join state lawmakers from across the nation at a private ALEC meeting later this month in California, where they’ll work behind closed doors with large corporations on so-called “model” bills to push through the 2016 legislative session with minimal public input and scrutiny.

While corporations have every right to pursue legislation favorable to their interests, why operate so secretly? Along with private bill-drafting sessions, lawmakers also avoid claiming authorship when ALEC bills emerge in their states.

If the ventures are worthwhile, what’s to hide?

Kansans interested in knowing more should see “United States of ALEC” from journalist Bill Moyers, available online at billmoyers.com.

Whether or not Kansans want more corporate-interest control, they should know how ALEC influences many state lawmakers.

Local and area lawmakers linked to ALEC include Sen. Larry Powell, R-Garden City; Sen. Garrett Love, R-Montezuma; Sen. Mitch Holmes, R-St. John; and Rep. Steve Alford, R-Ulysses.

When 2016 elections roll around in Kansas, voters tired of taking a back seat should unseat ALEC followers who put interests of big corporations first — and at significant cost to the state as a whole.

The Wichita Eagle reports:

By: Bryan Lowry

Fourteen Republican lawmakers are attending the annual ALEC conference in San Diego this week in part on the taxpayer’s dime.

It’s one of several conferences attended by lawmakers this summer.

The American Legislative Exchange Council has helped craft several pieces of legislation that have gained traction at the Kansas Statehouse in recent years. For example, the 2013 innovative school districts program, which exempts participating districts from certain state regulations, can be traced to a model bill from ALEC.

The annual conference, which is closed to the public, could generate more ideas that gain traction in Topeka.

Fourteen lawmakers had their registration fees paid for by the state at a total cost of $7,300, according to Legislative Administrative Services. More lawmakers probably are attending the conference, which runs July 22 through 24, but registered on their own and paid their own fees.

The lawmakers who had their fee paid for by the state: Reps. Steve Brunk, Dan Hawkins, Dennis Hedke and Gene Suellentrop, all Republicans from Wichita; Rep. Marvin Kleeb, R-Overland Park, the House Tax chairman; Rep. Ron Highland, R-Wamego, the House Education chairman; Rep. John Barker, R-Abilene, the House Judiciary chairman; Reps. James Todd and Jerry Lunn, both Republicans from Overland Park; Rep. Will Carpenter, R-El Dorado; Rep. Kevin Jones, R-Wellsville; Rep. Charles Macheers, R-Shawnee; Rep. Joe Seiwert, R-Pretty Prairie; and Sen. Larry Powell, R-Garden City.

House Speaker Ray Merrick, R-Stilwell, and Senate President Susan Wagle, R-Wichita, serve as board members for ALEC. Their staffs said that they are attending the conference but registered and paid independently. Senate Majority Leader Terry Bruce, R-Hutchinson, is also attending on his own.

“ALEC is a member-led organization of legislators from across the nation,” Merrick said in an e-mail. “ALEC provides a forum for legislators to discuss the challenges they face in their states and exchange best practices and policy ideas.”

ALEC sent out a message to registered lobbyists in Kansas in May asking them to help sponsor the conference. The message, which was signed by Merrick, said that “A sponsorship is an excellent opportunity to educate our members on your platform, both during the conference and in the months leading up.”

The message said sponsorships could range from $5,000 to $100,000 and contributions could be made by a corporation, individual or political action committee.

Asked about the solicitation for money from lobbyists when the Legislature was still in session, Merrick’s staff cited an exemption in Kansas law that allows lawmakers to solicit money “for the benefit of any national nonprofit, nonpartisan organization established for the purpose of serving, informing, educating and strengthening state legislatures in all states of the nation.”

ALEC has sometimes been criticized as a corporate bill mill. National Public Radio referred to it as a “dating service” for politicians and the nation’s biggest companies in a 2013 report. But some major tech companies, such as Google and eBay, have broken with the organization in recent years, contending that it has inhibited work to combat climate change.

The organization has helped craft and promote “stand your ground” laws, which have expanded gun rights, and “right to work” laws, which have lessened the power of unions.

ALEC is not the only conference that lawmakers attend to discuss legislation. Earlier this month, five lawmakers attended the Council of State Governments Midwest conference in Bismarck, North Dakota, registering through the state at a total cost of $1,975. Those lawmakers were Merrick; Powell; Rep. Steve Huebert, R-Valley Center; Rep. Sue Boldra, R-Hays; and Rep. Sue Concannon, R-Beloit.

Next month lawmakers from both parties will travel to Seattle to attend the National Conference of State Legislatures, which runs Aug. 3 through 6. The state is paying the registration fees for these seven lawmakers: Merrick; Rep. Les Osterman, R-Wichita; Rep. Scott Schwab, R-Olathe; Rep. Bud Estes, R-Dodge City; Rep. Sharon Schwartz, R-Washington; Rep. Troy Waymaster, R-Luray; and Rep. Barbara Ballard, D-Lawrence.

The total cost of their attendance is $3,909.



Groups Add to Evidence in "Whistleblower" Tax Fraud Claim Against ALEC -

Common Cause and the Center for Media and Democracy sent federal authorities new evidence today that the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) is falsely passing itself off as a tax-exempt charity and effectively using taxpayer dollars to subsidize its lobbying on behalf of private interests.

Common Cause filed a supplement to its three-year-old tax whistleblower complaint against ALEC, and the two groups sent a joint letter to Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen demanding an investigation, collection of fines and back taxes, and the revocation of ALEC’s status as a tax-exempt charity. Supporting evidence available here.

"Our whistleblower complaint, which includes statements, letters and correspondence from ALEC member companies and previously undisclosed public records of ALEC’s lobbying activities, demonstrates beyond doubt that ALEC is – and always has been – a lobby, not a charity," said Common Cause President Miles Rapoport.

The filing comes on the heels of ALEC’s threat in March to file suit against Common Cause and two other groups that have criticized ALEC’s positions on climate change and telecom issues. "This whistleblower supplement is unrelated to our dispute with ALEC on climate issues," Rapoport said, "but I hope that with today’s filing ALEC gets the message that we will not be deterred from working to expose its activities."

The new trove of documents includes statements by 20 corporations that admit that they joined and maintained membership in ALEC to influence legislation and gain access to lawmakers. The corporate admissions included in the complaint are from Yelp, Pfizer, AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, Honeywell, Yahoo, eBay, Eli Lilly, Duke Energy, Altria, American Electric Power, Anheuser-Busch, BP, Chevron, Cox Communications, CSX Corporation, ExxonMobil, Overstock, and Peabody Energy. Several of those companies no longer are part of ALEC.

The new filing also includes the recent finding of the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board that "ALEC’s primary purpose is the passage of state legislation in the various states and that all of its wide-ranging activities are in support of this primary purpose."

ALEC continues to deny that it is engaged in lobbying, submitting annual reports to the IRS with "$0" filled in on a line designated for the amount it spends on lobbying.

"Our powerful new evidence demonstrates that ALEC continues to operate as a 'corporate lobbying group masquerading as a charity,'" said Lisa Graves, Executive Director of the Center for Media and Democracy, publisher of PRWatch.org and ALECexposed.org. "Clearly, in their own words, many of the corporations that fund ALEC use it as a vehicle for their lobbying agenda."

"ALEC is a pay-to-play operation where corporate lobbyists pay for a seat and a vote as equals with legislators on model bills to benefit the legislative agenda of those very same special interests," Graves added. "Though ALEC claims that it is now a legislator-driven, bottom-up enterprise, our evidence shows that the corporations underwriting ALEC continue to drive its legislative priorities and do so to benefit their bottom lines. ALEC operates for the private gain of its corporate funders like a trade group, offering them one-stop shopping for lawmakers nationwide."

In response to the groups’ past exposure of its misreporting and illegal schemes, ALEC formed a lobbying arm, the Jeffersonian Project, in 2013; it also made some changes on its tax forms, and now admits responsibility for a "scholarship" fund used to finance legislator travel.

"ALEC tried to outsource some of its more obvious lobbying to the Jeffersonian Project, an entity that ALEC controls," said Eric Havian, an attorney representing Common Cause on the submission. "But hiding its lobbying behind a different corporate mask doesn’t absolve ALEC. ALEC still manages the most critical lobbying activities, such as hosting junkets to bring legislators and lobbyists together at posh resorts to strategize about how to pass favored legislation."

Today’s submission to the IRS is the third challenge Common Cause and CMD have made against ALEC for masquerading as a charity at taxpayer expense.

"It has been almost exactly three years since we uncovered ALEC’s tax misrepresentation and first reported it to the IRS," Rapoport said. "Three years later, the IRS Whistleblower Office has not taken action, despite its legal mandate to investigate complaints. Meanwhile, ALEC continues its secretive lobbying activities that often benefit the corporations’ bottom line."

The growing scandal surrounding ALEC’s tax status, secretive lobbying activities, and extremist agenda has led to an exodus of more than 100 corporations since 2011.

"The work of a robust national coalition has pushed more than 100 companies to dump ALEC," Graves said. "Other companies and elected officials should seriously reconsider sticking with a group that has misled and continues to mislead the public and the IRS about its true purpose."

Click here for a fact sheet on the submission.

 

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 As of April 2015, at least 103 corporations and 19 non-profits -- for a total of 120 private sector members -- have publicly announced that they cut ties with the American Legislative Exchange Council(ALEC)

 

  • Coca-Cola Company: Gave a statement to the Washington Examiner on April 4th, 2012 stating that it had "elected to discontinue its membership with the American Legislative Exchange Council" [1]
  • Pepsi: Informed Color of Change in a letter dated January 25th, 2012 that they would not renew their membership in ALEC in 2012.[2]
  • Kraft: Announced in an email on April 6th, 2012 that "Our membership in ALEC expires this spring and for a number of reasons...we have made the decision not to renew." [3]
  • Intuit: Told the Center for Media and Democracy on April 6th, 2012 that they did not renew their membership when it expired in 2011. [4]
  • McDonald's: Initially defended its membership in ALEC [5] Announced on April 10th that they had made the decision to withdraw from ALEC at the end of March. [6]
  • Wendy's: Sent an email to the Center for Media and Democracy on April 11th, 2012 confirming that it is no longer a member of ALEC [7]
  • Mars: Sent an email to Color of Change on April 12th, 2012 stating that they had ended their membership with ALEC [8]
  • Reed Elsevier: Told Reuters on April 12th, 2012 that they had withdrawn "after considering the broad range of criticism being leveled at ALEC," [9]
  • American Traffic Solutions: Told the Arizona Capitol Times on April 13th, 2012 that they would not renew their ALEC membership. [10]
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield: Announced on April 19th, 2012 that it had not renewed its membership in February 2012,[11] but according to an ALEC document, "left after losing on exchanges workshop" and didn't terminate until April 4, 2013.[12]
  • YUM! Brands: Told Color of Change that they would not renew their membership on April 19th, 2012.[13]
  • Procter & Gamble: Told Color of Change that it would not renew its membership on April 20th, 2012.[14]
  • Kaplan: Wrote Republic Report on April 26th, 2012 to confirm that they were no longer a member of ALEC[15]
  • Scantron Corporation: Told CMD in May 2012 that it was no longer a member of ALEC.[16]
  • Amazon.com: Announced at a shareholder meeting on May 24, 2012 that it had decided not to renew its membership in ALEC this year.[17]
  • Medtronic: Medtronic did not renew its ALEC membership in 2011 or 2012, according to a spokesperson.[18]
  • Wal-Mart: Wal-Mart told Reuters on May 30, 2012 that it is suspending its ALEC membership because "we feel that the divide between these activities and our purpose as a business has become too wide," according to Wal-Mart vice president of public affairs and government relations and ALEC corporate board secretary Maggie Sans.[19]
  • Johnson & Johnson: A Johnson & Johnson spokesperson told CMD on June 12, 2012, "We have been in dialogue with the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) for some time, and while we acknowledge ALEC’s recent decision to focus only on innovation and growth-supporting policies, we have decided to suspend our participation and membership.”[20]
  • Dell Computers: Dell confirmed on June 21, 2012, that it would not be renewing its ALEC membership.[21]
  • John Deere & Company told ColorOfChange.org in July 2012 that it is leaving ALEC.[22]
  • CVS Caremark told ColorOfChange.org in July 2012 that it had discontinued its ALEC membership.[22]
  • MillerCoors told ColorOfChange.org in July 2012 that it had not renewed its ALEC membership in 2012, nor does it plan to.[22]
  • Hewlett-Packard (HP) told ColorOfChange.org in July 2012 that it is not currently an ALEC member.[22]
  • Best Buy told ColorOfChange.org in July 2012 that it had not renewed its ALEC membership in 2012.[22]
  • Express Scripts/Medco (two ALEC members that merged in April 2012) told the Center for Media and Democracy and ColorOfChange.org in July 2012 that it had dropped its ALEC membership.[23][24] An August 2013 ALEC board document later suggested that it had not terminated its ALEC membership until January 14, 2013, "b/c of PBM issue."[12]
  • Connections Academy, which had been co-chair of ALEC's Education Task Force, told CMD in July 2012 that it withdrew from ALEC's Education Task Force in mid-May 2012 in order to align "our affiliations with organizations whose central focus is education."[25]
  • General Motors (GM), which had been a member of ALEC's Commerce, Insurance and Economic Development Task Force and its Energy, Environment and Agriculture Task Force, told CMD in July 2012 that it had "decided to discontinue relations with ALEC at this time."[26]
  • Walgreens, which had been a member of ALEC's Health and Human Services Task Force, told ColorOfChange.org in July 2012 that it "will not be renewing its membership in the American Legislative Exchange Council."[26]
  • Louis Dreyfus, which sponsored ALEC's 2012 annual meeting, told CMD it had decided not to fund ALEC this year.[27]
  • Amgen, which was a member of ALEC's Health and Human Services Task Force, announced its determination not to renew its ALEC membership on August 3 in response to a letter from a group of concerned shareholders and advocates led by Walden Asset Management and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME).[28]
  • General Electric (GE), which was a member of ALEC's Tax and Fiscal Policy Task Force as of March 2011,[29] told ColorOfChange.org (CoC) that it decided not to renew its ALEC membership in July 2012.[30]
  • Western Union, which was a member of ALEC's Commerce, Insurance and Economic Development Task Force as of June 2011,[31] told CoC that the company was only an ALEC member in 2011 and chose not to renew in May 2012.[30]
  • Sprint Nextel, which was a member of ALEC's Communications and Technology Task Force in July 2011, told CoC in August 2012 that it did not renew its ALEC membership in 2012.[30]
  • Symantec, which was a member of ALEC's Communications and Technology Task Force, told CoC in August 2012 that the company's membership expired June 2010 and was not renewed.[30]
  • Reckitt Benckiser Group, which was a member of ALEC's Health and Human Services Task Force as of June 2011,[32] told CoC in August 2012 that it is no longer an ALEC member.[30]
  • Entergy, which was a member of ALEC's Civil Justice Task Force as of June 2011, told Walden Asset Management in August 2012 that it did not renew its ALEC membership in 2012.[30]
  • Merck, which told the New Jersey Star-Ledger in September 2012 that it would not renew its ALEC membership after 2012.[33]
  • Sanofi, which confirmed to CMD that it was cutting ties to ALEC in October 2012.[34]
  • Bank of America, which told Walden Asset Management that it was cutting ties to ALEC in November 2012.[35]
  • WellPoint, which announced on March 1, 2013 that it had not attended an ALEC meeting nor supported ALEC financially since the summer of 2011 and has "no current plans to support ALEC or attend any of their meetings,"[36] but according to an August 2013 ALEC board document, terminated April 22, 2013 and was then "considering giving funds outside of membership."[12]
  • Bristol-Myers Squibb, which confirmed in March 2013 that it had not renewed its ALEC membership at the end of 2012.[37]
  • Brown-Forman Company, which confirmed in April 2013 that the company declined to renew its ALEC membership in 2012[38]
  • Publix Super Markets, which announced on June 24, 2013, via social media that it had "not been a member of ALEC since 2011."[39]
  • GlaxoSmithKline, whose CEO, Sir Andrew Witty, said in a response to a shareholder's question at the company's annual meeting in May 2013 that the company had decided to sever its relationship with ALEC[40]
  • Unilever, whose president, Kees Kruythoff, stated in a letter to shareholders sent earlier this year, "Unilever is not a member of ALEC following a review undertaken at the end of 2011. We took the decision that ALEC's agenda did not align with our business objectives and values focused on social, economic, and environmental sustainability, and withdrew as a member."[40]
  • ConocoPhillips spokesperson Daren Beaudo confirmed to CMD in June 2013 that the company is no longer a member of ALEC, did not fund ALEC in 2012, and has no plans to do so in 2013.[40] In 2014, however, ConocoPhillips -- under the name of Phillips 66 -- was a "Director" level sponsor of the 2014 ALEC Annual Conference.[41]
  • Sallie Mae announced quietly in September 2013 that it had cut ties with ALEC, after a student-led campaign demanded its exit, gathering nearly 15,000 petition signatures in August.[42]
  • Visa told Boston Common Asset Management, which had been engaging with the company over the past year on lobbying disclosure, that it had dropped its ALEC membership in December 2013.[43]
  • Xcel Energy, the ALEC corporate state chair of Wisconsin as of August 2011, told the Boulder Weekly in January 2014 that it was a member of ALEC until 2011[44] and that it hadn't funded ALEC since 2010.[45]
  • Endo Pharmaceuticals, a member of ALEC's Health and Human Services Task Force as of April 2012, announced that it had cut ties with ALEC in January 2014 after engagement with Trillium Asset Management[46]
  • 3M, an ALEC member in the late 1990s,[47] stated as of a company corporate governance disclosure revised in May 2013, "3M has not been a member in groups such as the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC)."[48]
  • Darden Restaurants, a member of ALEC's corporate board as of 2010,[49] confirmed in April 2013 that the company cut ties with ALEC in January 2010 in order to allocate more resources to organizational connections like its involvement with the National Restaurant Association[50] (which, like ALEC, has lobbied to override local paid sick day ordinances).[51]
  • IBM confirmed in June 2013 that it is no longer an ALEC member and does not "provide ALEC with any financial support, including financial support for their meetings."[52]
  • Intel, an ALEC funder in 2002,[53] stated in June 2013 that it is not a member of ALEC and does not sponsor ALEC[54]
  • Nestlé USA Inc. was, according to a company spokesperson, "a low-tier member of ALEC during a several year span in the 1990s ending, as I recall, in 1999, but has "not been a member of ALEC since that time" and does "not foresee a circumstance where we would consider rejoining," as of May 2013.[55]
  • AstraZeneca, a member of ALEC's Health and Human Services Task Force as well as state corporate co-chair of Delaware, confirmed in response to an April 2013 shareholder question that it decided not to renew its membership in ALEC's task force.[56]
  • Ameren, a sponsor of ALEC's 1998 annual meeting as well as of "Missouri Night" at Antoine's Restaurant in New Orleans during the 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting, told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that the company is not a member of ALEC in April 2014.[57]
  • Berkshire Hathaway Energy (formerly MidAmerican Energy Holdings Company), which had a long history of involvement with ALEC, having sponsored ALEC's 1998 annual meeting, confirmed to Greenpeace in May 2014 that it had cut ties to ALEC.[58]
  • PacifiCorp, a member of the ALEC Energy, Environment and Agriculture Task Force, confirmed to Greenpeace in May 2014 that it had cut ties to ALEC.[58]
  • NV Energy, a member of the ALEC Energy, Environment and Agriculture Task Force as well as ALEC corporate co-chair of Nevada, confirmed to Greenpeace in May 2014 that it had cut ties to ALEC.[58]
  • Alliant Energy, which sponsored ALEC's 1998 annual meeting, confirmed to Greenpeace in May 2014 that it had cut ties to ALEC.[58]
  • The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), which funded ALEC in at least 2010 and earlier, confirmed to Greenpeace in May 2014 that it had cut ties to ALEC.[58]
  • Microsoft, a member of the ALEC Communications and Technology Task Force, confirmed that "in 2014 Microsoft decided to no longer participate in the American Legislative Exchange Council’s Communications and Technology Task Force, which had been our only previous involvement with ALEC. With this decision, we no longer contribute any dues to ALEC" in an email to The Sustainability Group of Loring, Wolcott and Coolidge and Walden Asset Management, which had engaged Microsoft over its affiliation with ALEC.[59]
  • Google , a member of the ALEC Communications and Technology Task Force, confirmed that it would not renew its ALEC membership at the end of 2014[60] after its chairman, Eric Schmidt, told NPR's Diane Rehm on September 22, 2014, "The consensus within the company was that that was some sort of mistake and so we're trying to not do that in the future.... The company has a very strong view that we should make decisions in politics based on facts -- what a shock. And the facts of climate change are not in question anymore. Everyone understands climate change is occurring and the people who oppose it are really hurting our children and our grandchildren and making the world a much worse place. And so we should not be aligned with such people -- they're just, they're just literally lying."[61]
  • Facebook, a member of the ALEC Communications and Technology Task Force, told the San Francisco Chronicle on September 23, 2014: “We re-evaluate our memberships on an annual basis and are in that process now. While we have tried to work within ALEC to bring that organization closer to our view on some key issues, it seems unlikely that we will make sufficient progress so we are not likely to renew our membership in 2015.” [62]
  • Yelp told Common Cause on September 24, 2014 that they are no longer part of ALEC. [63]
  • Yahoo Inc. announced on September 24, 2014 -- after Microsoft, Google, Facebook, and Yelp dropped ALEC that week and ALEC responded by saying that Google had left because of misinformation -- that it had dropped its membership of ALEC.[64]
  • International Paper told Common Cause September 26, 2014 that "we no longer have a membership with ALEC" and confirmed the company also no longer funds ALEC.[65]
  • Occidental Petroleum Corporation had "no plans to continue Occidental's membership in, or make further payments to, ALEC" as of September 29, 2014, according to the National Journal.[66]
  • News Corporation told Media Matters in response to an article published September 26, 2014 that the company is no longer a member of ALEC.[67]
  • Overstock.com terminated its ALEC membership in 2013, according to a spokesperson,[68] but a spokesperson told The Guardian in December 2014, "Overstock.com did re-join Alec recently. Our relationship with Alec is based on the organization's access to lawmakers involved in the internet sales tax issue, which is a very weighty one for us."[69]
  • SAP America told German Magazine “Manager Magazin”, on November 5, 2014, that it was ceasing funding of ALEC because of “strange policies” around climate change, renewable energy, guns and voting rights. [70]
  • AOL informed Common Cause on November 10, 2014 that it had stopped funding ALEC. [71]
  • Emerson Electric Co. told Walden Asset Management that it had cut ties with ALEC in November 2014.[72]
  • Amerigroup told Common Cause that the company no longer participates in ALEC in November 2014.[73]
  • Wells Fargo, which was a member of ALEC in 2011, told CMD in September 2012 that it declined to renew its ALEC membership in 2012,[33] then subsequently sponsored ALEC's 2013 Annual Meeting in Chicago,[74] then told Common Cause in November 2014 that it is not a member or funder of ALEC.[73]
  • Union Pacific Corporation confirmed to Common Cause in November 2014 that the company is "not a member of ALEC and pays no annual dues to the organization".[73]
  • EZCorp (pawn shops and payday loans), told Common Cause that it is not a funder or member of ALEC as of November 2014[75]
  • eBay tweeted on December 18, 2014, "We are not renewing membership in ALEC."[76]
  • Northrop Grumman cut ties to ALEC in January 2015 thanks to shareholder engagement from the Fond du Lac, Wisconsin-based Congregation of Sisters of St. Agnes.[77][78]
  • BP announced on March 23, 2015 that it was cutting ties with ALEC. A spokesperson told the National Review, "We continually assess our engagements with policy and advocacy organizations and based on our most recent assessment, we have determined that we can effectively pursue policy matters of current interest to BP without renewing our membership in ALEC."[79]
  • T-Mobile told Common Cause on April 8, 2015 that it had cut ties to ALEC.[80]
  • Allergan: told Common Cause on May 14, 2015 that it "is no longer an active member of ALEC."[81]

An August 2013 ALEC board document released by The Guardian in December 2013 listed the following additional corporations as "LAPSED Members" of ALEC, with the accompanying "termination date," and any notes added by ALEC:[12]

Trade Associations and Non-Profits

  • Gates Foundation: Gates spokesman Chris Williams, while careful to note that Gates has never been a formal ALEC member, told Roll Call on April 9, 2012 that it does not plan to renew its financial support for ALEC's education initiatives. "We have made a single grant, narrowly and specifically focused on providing information to ALEC-affiliated state legislators on teacher effectiveness and school finance," said Williams.[84]
  • National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS): In an official statement sent to the Center for Media and Democracy (CMD) on May 1, 2012, NBPTS spokesperson Brian Lewis said, "Given recent events, the new NBPTS President and CEO decided to discontinue engagement with ALEC. As a result, NBPTS terminated its membership as an Education Task Force Member of ALEC effective April 18, 2012, and also withdrew from participating in the upcoming ALEC conference. . . . The decision to participate in ALEC had been made by previous NBPTS leadership."[85]
  • National Association of Charter School Authorizers (NACSA): On May 14, 2012, NACSA issued a press release announcing that, "As part of our annual review processes, however, we determined that alternative strategies would be more effective in achieving these policy objectives. Thus we will not be renewing our membership in ALEC when it expires next month."[86]
  • Lumina Foundation for Education: A Lumina spokesperson told CMD on May 23, 2012, "Lumina Foundation last paid annual dues to ALEC on 10/08/10. No staff member was able to attend meetings in 2011. We decided not to renew our membership, because we were not participating."[87]
  • Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA): In December 2012, SEIA said in an email to supporters that it had joined ALEC earlier in 2012 to promote bipartisan energy policies, but had decided not to renew its membership.[88] An August 2013 ALEC document noted that SEIA "left because their bill did not pas the task force."[12]
  • American Wind Energy Association (AWEA): In January 2013, AWEA dropped out of ALEC and warned state lawmakers not to be taken in by ALEC's message, one that AWEA spokesperson Peter Kelley toldGreenwire is driven by fossil fuel companies.[89]

An August 2013 ALEC board document released by The Guardian in December 2013 listed the following additional trade groups and non-profits as "LAPSED Members" of ALEC, with the accompanying "termination date" listed in ALEC's spreadsheet, as well as any notes made by ALEC (NOTE: MANY OF THESE GROUPS SHARE IDEOLOGICAL AIMS WITH ALEC):[12]

 

 

 

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